divaofthedevas
i-nataraja:

Vitruvian Shiva

Based on Leonardo Da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man and the iconic Hindu image of Shiva Nataraja, of course. Beautifully executed by John Edward Faulkner, I think.
But who the hell is this Faulkner guy? He has a blog with no info on it - just a cool gif. IT’S A MYSTERY.
Leonardo da Vinci
Le proporzioni del corpo umano secondo Vitruvio/The propotions of the human body according to Vitruvius
Italy (1490)
[x]

Unknown Chola artist
Nataraja/Shiva as the Lord of the Dance
India (950-1000)
[x]

i-nataraja:

Vitruvian Shiva

Based on Leonardo Da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man and the iconic Hindu image of Shiva Nataraja, of course. Beautifully executed by John Edward Faulkner, I think.

But who the hell is this Faulkner guy? He has a blog with no info on it - just a cool gif. IT’S A MYSTERY.

Leonardo da Vinci

Le proporzioni del corpo umano secondo Vitruvio/The propotions of the human body according to Vitruvius

Italy (1490)

[x]

Unknown Chola artist

Nataraja/Shiva as the Lord of the Dance

India (950-1000)

[x]

Incense burner
Porcelain horse: China (1661–1722; Qing dynasty, Kangxi reign)
Lacquer bowls: Japan (1600s; Edo period)
Gilded bronze mounts: France (1770s)
Asian Civilisations Museum, Singapore
[x]
I’ve got hold of some images from the fascinating China Mania! The Global Passion for Porcelain 800–1900  exhibition, which is running at the ACM till 14 December, 2014! Loads of weird intercultural artefacts - mostly Chinese porcelain manufactured for export. Like this baby here:

This object was assembled in Europe during the 18th century from several components. The Chinese porcelain horse, made in the Kangxi reign, is realistically modelled onto a green-glazed base that imitates grass. Above it are two Japanese lacquer bowls set rim to rim; inside is a metal tray meant to hold buring incense, which would escape through the openings in the ring. Crowning the construction is a piece of red coral.
The pieces are held together by gilded bronze mounts probably made in France. Such fantasies, which blend objects from different cultures and mix the natural with the man-made, were favoured in the Baroque and Rococo periods in Europe (17th and 18th centuries).

Incense burner

Porcelain horse: China (1661–1722; Qing dynasty, Kangxi reign)

Lacquer bowls: Japan (1600s; Edo period)

Gilded bronze mounts: France (1770s)

Asian Civilisations Museum, Singapore

[x]

I’ve got hold of some images from the fascinating China Mania! The Global Passion for Porcelain 800–1900  exhibition, which is running at the ACM till 14 December, 2014! Loads of weird intercultural artefacts - mostly Chinese porcelain manufactured for export. Like this baby here:

This object was assembled in Europe during the 18th century from several components. The Chinese porcelain horse, made in the Kangxi reign, is realistically modelled onto a green-glazed base that imitates grass. Above it are two Japanese lacquer bowls set rim to rim; inside is a metal tray meant to hold buring incense, which would escape through the openings in the ring. Crowning the construction is a piece of red coral.

The pieces are held together by gilded bronze mounts probably made in France. Such fantasies, which blend objects from different cultures and mix the natural with the man-made, were favoured in the Baroque and Rococo periods in Europe (17th and 18th centuries).

angrytibetangirl

angrytibetangirl:

blacknoonajade:

Monks from India and Tibet have shown up in support of Michael Brown and Ferguson. 

If that isn’t powerful, I don’t know what is. 

#solidarity

You know what I appreciate? Folks associate Buddhism and other Indic religions with peace - i.e. meditate and everything will be hunky-dory.

Well, sometimes, what you need isn’t peace. It’s justice.

In honour of today’s Scottish referendum:
Michael Hays
Chicken tikka masala
UK (2007)
[x]
There are many possible origins for this not-completely-Indian dish, and at least one of them stems from Scotland:

One claim recounts how a Pakistani chef, Ali Ahmed Aslam (proprietor of the Shish Mahal restaurant in the west end of Glasgow) invented chicken tikka masala by improvising a sauce made from yogurt, cream and spices. His son Asif Ali told the story of its 1971 invention to the BBC’s Hairy Bikers TV cookery programme:
"On a typical dark, wet Glasgow night a bus driver coming off shift came in and ordered a chicken curry. He sent it back to the waiter saying it’s dry. At the time Dad had an ulcer and was enjoying a plate of tomato soup. So he said why not put some tomato soup into the curry with some spices. They sent it back to the table and the bus driver absolutely loved it. He and his friends came back again and again and we put it on the menu.”

There’s a big debate between Scots (led by former Glasgow MP Mohammad Sarwar) and Indian voices about who invented it - and even the Indian side accounts are split on whether it’s an ancient Mughal dish or a modern Punjabi dish!
Seriously, guys - you can have it both ways. Delicious things may be invented more than once.

In honour of today’s Scottish referendum:

Michael Hays

Chicken tikka masala

UK (2007)

[x]

There are many possible origins for this not-completely-Indian dish, and at least one of them stems from Scotland:

One claim recounts how a Pakistani chef, Ali Ahmed Aslam (proprietor of the Shish Mahal restaurant in the west end of Glasgow) invented chicken tikka masala by improvising a sauce made from yogurt, cream and spices. His son Asif Ali told the story of its 1971 invention to the BBC’s Hairy Bikers TV cookery programme:

"On a typical dark, wet Glasgow night a bus driver coming off shift came in and ordered a chicken curry. He sent it back to the waiter saying it’s dry. At the time Dad had an ulcer and was enjoying a plate of tomato soup. So he said why not put some tomato soup into the curry with some spices. They sent it back to the table and the bus driver absolutely loved it. He and his friends came back again and again and we put it on the menu.”

There’s a big debate between Scots (led by former Glasgow MP Mohammad Sarwar) and Indian voices about who invented it - and even the Indian side accounts are split on whether it’s an ancient Mughal dish or a modern Punjabi dish!

Seriously, guys - you can have it both ways. Delicious things may be invented more than once.

ultrafacts
ultrafacts:

shitfacedanon:

arachnofiend:

footworkdruid:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow the Ultrafacts Blog!

i really like this ultrafact because the setup implies something funny or unexpected is going to happen, but not only is the ‘punchline’ actually just standard torturous murder but the lack of punctuation adds a bizarre, text-post quality to the tone. syntactically speaking this ultrafact is a piece of accidental genius

The Mongol Empire was the safest place in the world as long as you didn’t backstab the Mongols.

To add to this, he actually sent two. The first was to sorta present a message of peace telling the leader in essence “We’re both great leaders of great empires and equals in stature.” and after the fucker killed the first caravan he sent another to figure out what the hell happened because maybe the fucker didn’t know who he was.
Then he invaded and utterly erased the empire off the face of the earth 

Did you guys know that Genghis Khan even went so far as to divert a river through the Khwarezmid emperor’s birthplace, erasing it from the map? This was how mad the emperor made Genghis feel. (Source)

Now this is bad-ass. Khwarezmia was in present-day Iran and Afghanistan, in case ya didn’t know.

ultrafacts:

shitfacedanon:

arachnofiend:

footworkdruid:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow the Ultrafacts Blog!

i really like this ultrafact because the setup implies something funny or unexpected is going to happen, but not only is the ‘punchline’ actually just standard torturous murder but the lack of punctuation adds a bizarre, text-post quality to the tone. syntactically speaking this ultrafact is a piece of accidental genius

The Mongol Empire was the safest place in the world as long as you didn’t backstab the Mongols.

To add to this, he actually sent two. The first was to sorta present a message of peace telling the leader in essence “We’re both great leaders of great empires and equals in stature.” and after the fucker killed the first caravan he sent another to figure out what the hell happened because maybe the fucker didn’t know who he was.

Then he invaded and utterly erased the empire off the face of the earth 

Did you guys know that Genghis Khan even went so far as to divert a river through the Khwarezmid emperor’s birthplace, erasing it from the map? This was how mad the emperor made Genghis feel. (Source)

Now this is bad-ass. Khwarezmia was in present-day Iran and Afghanistan, in case ya didn’t know.

Unknown artist

The first Japanese Embassy to Europe

Germany? (1586)

Top, from left to right: Julião Nakaura, Father Mesquita, Mancio Itō.

Bottom, from left to right: Martinho Hara, Miguel Chijiwa.

Unknown artist

The Japanese embassy with Pope Gregory XIII 

Italy? (1585)

[x]

The Tensho embassy left Nagasaki in 1582, and went on to Goa (India) before arriving in Lisbon in 1584. Among the nobles they met in Europe were King Philip II of Spain, Francesco I de’ Medici, the Grand Duke of Tuscany, Pope Gregory XIII and his successor Pope Sixtus V.

They arrived back in Japan in 1590, and were subsequently ordained as the first ever Japanese Jesuit fathers by Alessandro Valignano.

They were not, in fact, the first Japanese to visit Europe. The earliest one on record we have so far is Bernardo the Japanese, a disciple of St Francis Xavier who did a one-way trip to Europe in 1553. But there’s every chance they’ll discover someone else!

Photograph of Steven Salaita

[x]

Steven Salaita

The Holy Land in Transit: Colonialism and the Quest for Canaan

US (2006)

[x]

The News Gazette's run a story on the teaching background of Salaita, the Palestinian/Jordanian-American prof whose pro-Gaza tweets made the University of Illinois go back on their decision to hire him.

Lots of interesting stuff, e.g. how he reassured students after the Virginia Tech shooting massacre, but I find this most fascinating:

Critics have questioned why an academic who has written so much on Israel and Arab American literature would be hired by American Indian Studies.

Kauanui and others said those critics are missing a huge aspect of his work. Salaita is a comparative scholar, Kauanui said, and the field itself is changing.

American Indian Studies wants to broaden its framework, comparing the Native American experience to that of other indigenous people around the globe, Kauanui said, The UI program, in fact, has hired scholars who focus on Native issues in Guam and the Pacific islands, she said.

Salaita has done research on Native North America, she said, and his training is in Native American studies. His early work focused on comparing colonialism by settlers in North America to those in Israel and the occupied territories. His 2006 book “The Holy Land in Transit: Colonialism and the Quest of Canaan,” based on his doctoral dissertation, examines how settlers in the Holy Land and the Americas used a “theological narrative to justify their occupation of foreign lands,” she said. “It’s a path-breaking book.”

thegetty
thegetty:

This is a zebu, known today as a Brahma bull.
Images of zebus and elephants represented connections to India, the farthest reach of Alexander the Great’s expansive empire.
Zebu, 200 - 150 B.C., Greek, Seleucia Pieria (in present-day Turkey). J. Paul Getty Museum. Gift of Barbara and Lawrence Fleischman.

Good ol’ Alexander/Iskandar, bringing South Asia and Southern Europe that much closer…
One of these days I’m gonna do a step-by-step answer for scptember’s ask about the presence of white people/Europeans in Asia and Africa since antiquity, and Alexander’s empire will feature prominently.

thegetty:

This is a zebu, known today as a Brahma bull.

Images of zebus and elephants represented connections to India, the farthest reach of Alexander the Great’s expansive empire.

Zebu, 200 - 150 B.C., Greek, Seleucia Pieria (in present-day Turkey). J. Paul Getty Museum. Gift of Barbara and Lawrence Fleischman.

Good ol’ Alexander/Iskandar, bringing South Asia and Southern Europe that much closer…

One of these days I’m gonna do a step-by-step answer for scptember’s ask about the presence of white people/Europeans in Asia and Africa since antiquity, and Alexander’s empire will feature prominently.

The Malay Mail Online

Are Malaysians racist?

Malaysia (2014)

Oh yes, and Happy Hari Merdeka / Independence Day to all my Malaysian friends! Just wanna mark the occasion with an inspiring anti-racism project by the Malay Mail:

In the video, Malaysians of various ethnic groups — who did not know that they were being filmed — were asked to say derogatory statements about another race, like Malays are lazy, Chinese are “pendatang” (immigrants) and Indians are smelly.

But they refused to repeat those stereotypes even when they were offered money, with one respondent saying that she would not do so even if she were given a million ringgit.

“I cried at the 3min mark. In light of current events, and constant goading by fascist, right-wing elements, I think it’s alright to cry when watching this,” PKR communications director Fahmi Fadzil tweeted at his @fahmi_fadzil account.

I’m not entirely sure what current events are - but basically, even if these folks aren’t racist, there are a lot of powerful people in Malaysia who are. I suppose this makes the average person more willing to stand up for anti-racism initiatives. Let’s be like that.

magictransistor
magictransistor:

Robert Robinson. A Chinese Dignitary Riding a Fish. 1696. 

He’s a British artist. His stuff’s in the Victoria & Albert Museum.
And I know I’m supposed to get mad at the absurd misrepresentation that results from the exotification process of Chinoiserie…
… but the truth is, genuine Chinese art is just as trippy.

Unknown Chinese artist
Bronze of Two Men Riding Koi Fish
China (1800s)
[x]

magictransistor:

Robert Robinson. A Chinese Dignitary Riding a Fish. 1696. 

He’s a British artist. His stuff’s in the Victoria & Albert Museum.

And I know I’m supposed to get mad at the absurd misrepresentation that results from the exotification process of Chinoiserie

… but the truth is, genuine Chinese art is just as trippy.

Unknown Chinese artist

Bronze of Two Men Riding Koi Fish

China (1800s)

[x]